Concord Volunteer Fire Department, Company 13, Serving Campbell County and Appomattox County
News Headlines
Apparatus Gallery
2014 Call Volume
  Fire
Jan 28
Feb 21
Mar 28
Apr  
May  
Jun  
Jul  
Aug  
Sep  
Oct  
Nov  
Dec  
Total 77

View Call Volume History




 Firefighter Close Calls
 Print this page

Did You Hear The One About The IC...(The Secret List)
Hey, The term "did you hear the one about..." is usually related to a joke that's being told...or  story,.usually a good one-but not always. This time it's no joke. Did you hear the one about the Hartford FD incident commander at the fire that tragically killed Hartford FF Kevin Bell? If you read (and especially watched) the news report we passed on earlier-you did hear "the one about." But, like every Line of Duty death-at this early stage, the facts are not out. In nearly all line of duty deaths, the facts do come out...and I said nearly because there are some where the facts do not come out for a variety of reasons-from confusion to impossible determination to even political. Yeah-political. How about that. When you watch the news report-it is confusing to you-because you are Firefighters...so when you listened and watched the report I have to assume - word used intentionally - that you, like me, were confused and perhaps even annoyed-because of the way general aspects of the incidents were described in that story.  This was not at all the first fire that the IC had command of.  Why would the media report that?  Who would be a "source" to the media and give them that information?  It's easy for spectators on a Sunday to yell and scream at the football coach-especially in the comfort of the stands-and especially when they have never been coaches. The same fits to some extent to those who command fires. I remember as a young firefighter it was easy to criticize the IC's (we called them Chiefs back then) - and then in 1982, I became one. Things are a bit different when one goes from player to coach-you gain required perspective in now understanding you own this. Every aspect of the incident.  In this latest case, who knows what happened? No one yet. NIOSH? Not yet. State FM? Not yet. HFD. No-not yet..  Was a mayday call missed? I don't know-and neither will any of us until every aspect of the fire-.is investigated. "But the tape shows it!!!" Yeah-but that doesn't mean it was heard by the IC or others for that matter. In other fires across the US, maydays were transmitted - but not heard by radios on the fireground-even thought the "tapes" show it. The facts aren't out yet. "Sources reported....." So-called sources can be the most credible-or incredible-folks to those who may have a certain motivation for being a source. We don't know yet. Hose lines in front and back? Not unusual on any fireground. It sounded like the rear company asked for a line. Were the front and rear companies opposing and flowing at the same time? Were they communicating? How does fire science and fire behavior play into this? What about "modern" fire behavior?  Don't know yet-at least we don't-because the HFD, the SFM and NIOSH have not provided that info-it's way too soon. 30 minute's on an SCBA? Were they "30 minute" packs? Were they 45? Were they properly maintained and tested? What were the conditions of the masks?  Did they run out of air too soon?  Facts? Not yet. The Hartford Fire Department has some of the best Firefighters and Officers out there-that's been proven over time. They also have had a solid record of fireground survival-backed up by the fact that this was their first LODD in 40 YEARS. The fact is that the only thing that's really been proven-tragically-is that some Firefighters were injured-and a Firefighter, Kevin Bell-gave his life while serving Hartford. The rest - hopefully - will come out as facts - so that all of us can honor Kevin's life by learning about exactly what happened. A fire department is most fragile following the loss of one of their own. It can get very, very emotional, ugly and even nasty as every member on the scene-or not-deals with the loss of their Brother. The next layer are those members-all of them-who were there when their Brother or Sister was lost. Fragile? That doesn't even begin to describe it. And "it" is different for everyone involved-at every level...how we each grieve and deal with an insane range of emotions is just that-different for everyone involved.  Mark Twain said "Never pick a fight with people who buy ink by the barrel."...(meaning don't fight with the media) ...but on the other hand, Abe Lincoln said ""If I were to try to read, much less answer, all the attacks made on me, this shop might as well be closed for any other business. I do the very best I know how - the very best I can; and I mean to keep doing so until the end. If the end brings me out all right, what's said against me won't amount to anything. If the end brings me out wrong, ten angels swearing I was right would make no difference." Let's hope that as the professionals determine the facts in exactly what happened on October 7, 2014, the media goes easy with the "ink" - especially from info pushed by "sources"---understanding that the volatility of the family, the firefighters and the officers are directly impacted by what's said and printed. Fact or not. RIP Kevin Bell, God Bless his family, friends and all those impacted by this tragic loss. Take Care. Be Careful. Pass It On. BillyG The Secret List 10/30/2014-1534 Hours www.FireFighterCloseCalls.com ...


Update: KY Fire Captain Electrocution
A Firefighter who died after being jolted with electricity from a high-voltage line in Campbellsville made direct contact with the line, according to a report released Wednesday by the Kentucky Public Service Commission.Tony Grider, a captain with the Campbellsville fire department, was critically burned and died on Sept. 20, nearly a month after the accident.Grider, 41, and firefighter Alex Quinn, 22, were in the raised bucket of an aerial ladder truck at Campbellsville University on Aug. 21 to spray water on students as part of an event to raise research money for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease.The bucket was near a 69,000-volt transmission line that was 40 feet above the ground, according to a report Kentucky Utilities filed with the PSC.The bucket was 20 to 25 feet off the ground and extended at a right angle to the fire truck parked at an intersection on campus, the report said.Firefighters Steve Marrs and Alex Johnson were on the ground near the truck.Marrs and Johnson told investigators the firefighters had discussed the presence of the power lines nearby and the need to keep clear of them.​After the charity event was over, one of the firefighters using controls in the bucket began retracting the ladder, but for an “unknown reason” raised the bucket toward the line, according to information in the report.Witness Kyle Davis, safety director at the university, told KU investigators he saw the bucket rising as the ladder telescoped.Davis said he saw Grider’s head make direct contact with the high-voltage line.Grider was looking down at the time, said Davis, who felt “the percussion wave and the heat from the blast.”Johnson, one of the firefighters on the ground, said he was working to get the truck ready to return to the station when he saw a flash and felt a pain in his legs and back.When he regained his senses, he saw Quinn – who had knelt down in the basket to help Grider – stand up and make contact with the line, causing a second flash.Grider then stood up, but seemed disoriented and touched the line with his head again, causing a third flash, Johnson told the KU investigators. Davis said Johnson screamed over the radio for dispatchers to send help.Johnson and Marrs were able to lower the bucket using controls on the truck and begin helping Grider and Quinn.Quinn was seriously injured, but survived. Marrs and Johnson also sustained minor injuries.The day of the accident, local authorities said electricity had arced from the high-energy line to the bucket of the ladder truck, but that the bucket did not touch the line.Davis said there was not an arc.Davis told investigators there had been some discussion of parking the fire truck at another spot, but there was a concern about the water making a field muddy.KU was required to file a report with the PSC because of the accident.The PSC reviewed the report and found that the line met all safety standards, according to a news release.In a letter to KU, the PSC strongly recommended that KU and other electric utilities work closely with local fire departments to review safety practices applying in cases where aerial trucks are operated close to power lines.An investigation of the accident by the state occupational safety and health program continues, said spokesman Daniel Lowry.Read more here: http://www.kentucky.com/2014/10/29/3507966_report-campbellsville-firefighter.html?rh=1#storylink=cpy...


DID YOU HEAR THE ONE ABOUT THE IC......
The term "did you hear the one about..." is usually related to a joke that's being told...or  story,.usually a good one-but not always. This time it's no joke.Did you hear the one about the Hartford FD incident commander at the fire that tragically killed Hartford FF Kevin Bell? If you read (and especially watched) the news report we passed on earlier-you did hear "the one about." But, like every Line of Duty death-at this early stage, the facts are not out.In nearly all line of duty deaths, the facts do come out...and I said nearly because there are some where the facts do not come out for a variety of reasons-from confusion to impossible determination to even political. Yeah-political. How about that.When you watch the news report-it is confusing to you-because you are Firefighters...so when you listened and watched the report I have to assume - word used intentionally - that you, like me, were confused and perhaps even annoyed-because of the way general aspects of the incidents were described in that story. This was not at all the first fire that the IC had command of. Why would the media report that? Who would be a "source" to the media and give them that information? It's easy for spectators on a Sunday to yell and scream at the football coach-especially in the comfort of the stands-and especially when they have never been coaches. The same fits to some extent to those who command fires. I remember as a young firefighter it was easy to criticize the IC's (we called them Chiefs back then) - and then in 1982, I became one. Things are a bit different when one goes from player to coach-you gain required perspective in now understanding you own this. Every aspect of the incident. In this latest case, who knows what happened? No one yet. NIOSH? Not yet. State FM? Not yet. HFD. No-not yet.. Was a mayday call missed? I don't know-and neither will any of us until every aspect of the fire-.is investigated. "But the tape shows it!!!" Yeah-but that doesn't mean it was heard by the IC or others for that matter. In other fires across the US, maydays were transmitted - but not heard by radios on the fireground-even thought the "tapes" show it. The facts aren't out yet."Sources reported....." So-called sources can be the most credible-or incredible-folks to those who may have a certain motivation for being a source. We don't know yet.Hose lines in front and back? Not unusual on any fireground. It sounded like the rear company asked for a line. Were the front and rear companies opposing and flowing at the same time? Were they communicating? How does fire science and fire behavior play into this? What about "modern" fire behavior?  Don't know yet-at least we don't-because the HFD, the SFM and NIOSH have not provided that info-it's way too soon.30 minute's on an SCBA? Were they "30 minute" packs? Were they 45? Were they properly maintained and tested? What were the conditions of the masks? Did they run out of air too soon? Facts? Not yet.The Hartford Fire Department has some of the best Firefighters and Officers out there-that's been proven over time. They also have had a solid record of fireground survival-backed up by the fact that this was their first LODD in 40 YEARS. The fact is that the only thing that's really been proven-tragically-is that some Firefighters were injured-and a Firefighter, Kevin Bell-gave his life while serving Hartford. The rest - hopefully - will come out as facts - so that all of us can honor Kevin's life by learning about exactly what happened.A fire department is most fragile following the loss of one of their own. It can get very, very emotional, ugly and even nasty as every member on the scene-or not-deals with the loss of their Brother. The next layer are those members-all of them-who were there when their Brother or Sister was lost. Fragile? That doesn't even begin to describe it. And "it" is different for everyone involved-at every level...how we each grieve and deal with an insane range of emotions is just that-different for everyone involved. Mark Twain said "Never pick a fight with people who buy ink by the barrel."...(meaning don't fight with the media) ...but on the other hand, Abe Lincoln said ""If I were to try to read, much less answer, all the attacks made on me, this shop might as well be closed for any other business. I do the very best I know how - the very best I can; and I mean to keep doing so until the end. If the end brings me out all right, what's said against me won't amount to anything. If the end brings me out wrong, ten angels swearing I was right would make no difference."Let's hope that as the professionals determine the facts in exactly what happened on October 7, 2014, the media goes easy with the "ink" - especially from info pushed by "sources"---understanding that the volatility of the family, the firefighters and the officers are directly impacted by what's said and printed. Fact or not.RIP Kevin Bell, God Bless his family, friends and all those impacted by this tragic loss.Take Care. Be Careful. Pass It On....


Elizabeth man gets 13 years for causing crash that killed two inside ambulance - New Jersey
By Bill WichertMoments after receiving a 13-year prison sentence for causing a 2012 crash that killed two people, James Sterling today turned to the victims’ families and said he never meant to cause the deaths of their loved ones.“I just want to apologize,” Sterling told the family members from across a Newark courtroom. “I’m truly sorry. I hope y’all can find it in your heart to forgive me.”Sterling, 30, also known as James Megget, of Elizabeth, was sentenced to 13 years for causing the multi-vehicle crash in Newark on Nov. 19, 2012 that ultimately claimed the lives of Keith Chipepo and Martha Conley, who were riding in an ambulance at the time of the collision.Under a plea deal, Sterling pleaded guilty on July 17 to two counts of aggravated manslaughter. He was originally indicted on charges of aggravated manslaughter, eluding, aggravated assault, vehicular homicide, driving with a suspended license and causing death while driving with a suspended license.Sterling must serve about 11 years before he becomes eligible for parole, and his sentence will run concurrent to a prison term he’s serving for a parole violation.The case represents Sterling’s seventh felony conviction. His prior convictions were for aggravated assault, robbery, conspiracy, possession of narcotics and weapons offenses, prosecutors said.The family members of Chipepo and Conley declined to speak during the sentencing hearing.“Both families are very upset as to the actions that have taken place,” Essex County Assistant Prosecutor Jason Hollingsworth told Superior Court Judge Ronald Wigler.In a statement read by Hollingsworth during today’s hearing, the Chipepo family described Keith Chipepo as “a kind, joyful father, brother, son, and friend.”“He loved life, and he worked hard every day for his family and for everything he had,” the statement read. “We will always miss his smile.”Referring to Sterling, the statement continued: “You played a role in taking him from us but your family will have a chance to see you again while you are incarcerated.“For that, we hope you will never forget the part you took in taking the life of someone so great in our hearts,” the statement added. “You are fortunate to have the presence of your family, but we are left with just a memory of our beloved son & brother, taken from us way too soon.”The crash occurred at South Orange Avenue and South 9th Street in Newark when Sterling was driving a Chrysler Pacifica SUV, ran a red light and struck the ambulance, setting off a collision that also included a food truck and a county transportation bus, prosecutors said.As part of his 13-count indictment, Sterling had been charged with eluding police at the time of the crash.Chipepo, 30, of Montclair, who was employed by the private ambulance company, was killed in the crash, authorities said. Conley, 58, of Newark, who was a patient in the ambulance, died from her injuries on Nov. 28, 2012, authorities said.In handing down today’s sentence, Wigler said he hopes Sterling will reflect on his crime and “the devastation that you caused not one, but two families.”“Only time will tell if you’re gonna change your ways,” the judge said.Bill Wichert may be reached at bwichert@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @BillWichertNJ. Find NJ.com on Facebook. ...


Woman admits to driving drunk in wrong-way crash with ambulance - New York
By Frank Donnelly | fdonnelly@siadvance.com STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. – An Oakwood woman, who drove the wrong way on a South Shore street five months ago and crashed into an ambulance, has admitted to drunken driving.Rebecca Cassiliano, 58, was traveling the wrong way in a 2002 Hyundai Elantra on Father Capodanno Boulevard, near Sand Lane, when she struck the ambulance, just before 10 p.m. on May 27, said police.No one was injured, police said.However, Ms. Cassiliano was unsteady on her feet and her speech was slurred when she emerged from her car, cops said. Her eyes were watery, and her breath smelled of alcohol, police said.A test showed Ms. Cassiliano's blood alcohol content was .192 percent – more than double the .08 percent threshold for driving while intoxicated in New York, said a criminal complaint.Ms. Cassiliano pleaded guilty Tuesday in Stapleton Criminal Court to a misdemeanor count of driving while intoxicated, according to information from District Attorney Daniel Donovan's office.She was sentenced to a one-year conditional discharge and ordered to pay a $500 fine. Her driver's license was revoked for six months and she must install an ignition-interlock device for a year after her license is reinstated.Ms. Cassiliano was also ordered to participate in a drunken-driving-prevention program and a victim-impact panel, said Mark J. Fonte, her lawyer. The panel puts individuals face-to-face with victims of drunken drivers and their families, who relate their stories of loss and pain."I'm glad I was able to achieve closure on this matter," Fonte said. ...


Questions Raised/Probe/Video re: Hartford CT LODD (The Secret List)
Hey, The Hartford (CT) Fire Department is launching an "internal" investigation to find out what happened when a a 6 year Firefighter died in the Line of Duty at that house fire. See video below. FF Kevin Bell was killed in that two-alarm fire at a two-family home on Blue Hills Avenue on Oct. 7. Their board will be made up of seven people, all with very close ties to the HFD. Their goal will be getting answers for the public, but more importantly, Bell's family. Hartford Fire Chief Carlos Huertas appointed Chief Dan Nolan, who is the deputy fire chief of training, to chair a board of inquiry to review everything that went down on that night. Along with him, the fire marshal, two line deputy chiefs, two union officers and a representative from the employee assistance program make up this board. For the next six months, they'll be looking into the reports that were filed as well as interviewing the responding firefighters. Then, the board members will go through the footage taken on scene by local stations and eyewitnesses. They will also be looking at the gear that was used that night including Bell's to make sure everything was working right prior to him using it. The board along with the fire marshal and Occupational Safety and Health Administration will all be doing separate investigations. FF Bell's death is still a mystery. The medical examiner has not released a cause of death just yet. HERE IS MEDIA VIDEO: http://www.nbcconnecticut.com/video/#!/on-air/as-seen-on/Fatal-Fire-Probe-Examines-Air-Tanks--Mayday-Call/280880112 Lots to learn about FF Kevin Bell, the fire, what happened and why he died. Take Care. Be Careful. Pass It On. BillyG The Secret List 10-30-2014-0930 hrs www.FireFighterCloseCalls.com...


Paramedic Suicide Rates
“Paramedics under pressure: alarming suicide rates rock ambulance service” 14 hour night shift stretches to 20 hours, the effects of exhaustion and fatigue can quickly set in, sometimes with tragic consequences. SBS2’s The Feed spent time with some people who have experienced first-hand just how heavy the job’s toll can be. Source: The Feed Cath Mok clearly recalls her partner Helen’s excitement and optimism as she started her new career as a paramedic. “She was bright eyed and bushy tailed about it. Being a paramedic I think gave her lots of opportunities to use the good things about her personality,” she told The Feed. But after a number of years in the job, Helen’s ability to cope with the increasing demands were starting to drain. “There were a few accidents that she went to that she found very disturbing. Things like picking up body parts off the road, scraping people back together,” Cath said. “The thing that really troubled Helen with her work environment, towards the end certainly, was that she could never get home on time.” Despite Helen’s commitment to her profession, the toll on her family only became worse. Missed social gatherings and family occasions were the norm. By mid 2013, Helen was a shadow of her former self. Sadly, Helen’s story is becoming less of an isolated incident. According to data published by The Age, the suicide rate among Victorian paramedics is about 20 times higher than the general population. For more information go to:  http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2014/10/30/paramedics-under-pressure-alarming-suicide-rates-rock-ambulance-service ...


Questions Raised/Probe/Video re: Hartford CT LODD
The Hartford (CT) Fire Department is launching an "internal" investigation to find out what happened when a a 6 year Firefighter died in the Line of Duty at that house fire. See video below. FF Kevin Bell was killed in that two-alarm fire at a two-family home on Blue Hills Avenue on Oct. 7. Their board will be made up of seven people, all with very close ties to the HFD. Their goal will be getting answers for the public, but more importantly, Bell's family. Hartford Fire Chief Carlos Huertas appointed Chief Dan Nolan, who is the deputy fire chief of training, to chair a board of inquiry to review everything that went down on that night. Along with him, the fire marshal, two line deputy chiefs, two union officers and a representative from the employee assistance program make up this board. For the next six months, they'll be looking into the reports that were filed as well as interviewing the responding firefighters. Then, the board members will go through the footage taken on scene by local stations and eyewitnesses. They will also be looking at the gear that was used that night including Bell's to make sure everything was working right prior to him using it. The board along with the fire marshal and Occupational Safety and Health Administration will all be doing separate investigations. FF Bell's death is still a mystery. The medical examiner has not released a cause of death just yet. HERE IS MEDIA VIDEO: http://www.nbcconnecticut.com/video/#!/on-air/as-seen-on/Fatal-Fire-Probe-Examines-Air-Tanks--Mayday-Call/280880112 ...


MAYDAY/FF INJURED AT PA PIZZA PLACE FIRE
Two firefighters were blown down a flight of stairs Wednesday during a blaze at the Pizza Joe's building in Nazareth, borough Mayor Carl Strye Jr. said. The pair entered the structure before water arrived when, Strye explained, the fire "flashed over" and one responder suffered burns to his forearm. The blaze at the Pizza Joe's Italian Restaurant building was reported just after 10:30 a.m. and was extinguished by noon. Everyone who was in the 550 S. Main St. building when the fire started, left safely, Strye said. Vigilance Hose Co. No. 1 in Nazareth led the effort to save the building and it was assisted by several other nearby companies. The restaurant is on the first floor and much of the fire appeared to be on the second and third floors of the three-story brick building.  Borough fire Chief Danny Keenhold said he was not ready to state what caused the fire — the investigation is continuing — but he does not believe it to be suspicious. Most of the fire damage was done in the apartments above the restaurant, he said. The restaurant sustained significant smoke and water damage, he said. "It's a total loss. It's a real shame," he said about the building. The mayor, who was called to the scene from his job in Whitehall Township, said he was really saddened to see the state of the building, describing the damage as "major." "I feel for poor Jerry," Strye said of building and business owner Jerry Bubba. "He's got to be crushed." Jerry and Janel Bubba declined to speak to a reporter. Pizza's Joe's is a staple of Nazareth, Strye said. "Everyone knows Pizza Joe's," he said. "It's a landmark." But Strye is confident the community will rally around the owners and anyone else who lost anything on the fire. "They'll come together; they always do," he said. "And that's one good thing about living in a small town." Alysha Cole, 34, of Whitehall Township, was watching firefighters work on the blaze and had arrived at the scene early on with her boyfriend 28-year-old Wade VanBuskirk, of Nazareth, a volunteer firefighter with Nazareth's Vigilance Hose.  "It's a shame. We just ate here last night," Cole said, referring to the popular eatery.  Cole said the fire was the first one she's been at while her boyfriend has been on the job.  "I know what he does, but to actually see it? It's, um... it's a lot of different emotions," Cole said. "I just have this sigh of relief every time I see him come out of the building." Desiree Solliday, 25, of Nazareth, said she panicked when she smelled the smoke and heard calls on the emergency scanner referring to Pizza Joe's. Solliday said she has a good friend who works at the restaurant and who lives in an apartment above the eatery with his father. "I freaked out," Solliday said, noting she later heard from her friend. "It's so sad. Everybody loves this place." Pat Faustner, 57, of Nazareth, said she was "shocked"to find out it was Pizza Joe's that was burning. "I thought, 'Oh no,'" Faustner said. "It's one of the few good places left."http://www.lehighvalleylive.com/nazareth/index.ssf/2014/10/major_damage_in_building_that.html#incart_big-photo...


THE 5" ATTACK LINE!
This video will make you smile!...






Upcoming Events

7:00pm
Every 2nd Monday
BUSINESS MEETING


7:00pm
Every 1st Tuesday
TRAINING MEETING

Picture Gallery
Contact Information

Concord Volunteer Fire Department
12573 Richmond Hwy
Concord, VA  24538

Non-Emergency:
434-993-2085

Emergency:
911

Contact Us
Driving Directions
Map

Member Login

Username:


Password:




Links

Darlington County Extrication Team

Extrication Training and Tips


Redhouse Fire Department (Charlotte County Company 9)


Appomattox Fire Company


YourFirstDue.com Managed web hosting for Fire/EMS



Login



Copyright © 2006-2014. YourFirstDue Inc.. All Rights Reserved. Designated trademarks and brands are the property of their respective owners. Content on this web site is supplied by Concord Volunteer Fire Department. YourFirstDue Inc. cannot be held responsible or liable for any content, text, pictures, or any other media found on this web site. Maintained by the members and staff of Concord Volunteer Fire Department.

This site has been
viewed 279,025 times.