Concord Volunteer Fire Department, Company 13, Serving Campbell County and Appomattox County
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IAFF Ebola Video/Stand Down, Resources from IAFC (The Secret List)
All, The IAFF has released the below video of interest to all fire fighters and EMS personnel related to Ebola education and response. Take a moment to watch and learn from this excellent presentation----and note the recommended SAFETY STAND DOWN: http://youtu.be/4cL-BZw6u3E WATCH the Stand Down statement video from the IAFF GP: http://youtu.be/4AFtdMYI6tk Check out www.IAFF.org for more. Additionally, the IAFC has provided an excellent resource page: http://www.iafc.org/ebola The IAFC has formed an Ebola Task Force to provide guidance for the health and safety of fire fighters, EMT's and responders and patients in response to the recent diagnoses of several Ebola patients in the United States. The task force will be chaired by IAFC 2nd Vice President Chief John Sinclair and will include members and leadership from the Safety, Health & Survival Section-of the IAFC. The IAFC’s Ebola Task Force will review the management of Ebola patients from the time an emergency call is placed until the patient is confirmed as either having or not having Ebola. The task force will review several important issues with short- and long-term implications, including: Screening 9-1-1 calls for potential Ebola patientsProper PPETraining for PPE donning/doffing proceduresDecontamination practicesDefinition of exposureQuarantining employees who provide care for potential Ebola patientsOther issues as they arise Fire and EMS personnel should understand that this is an evolving and dynamic process; current best practices will evolve as new information is received. The task force will be meeting with the experts and will continue to educate and inform the fire service. Watch IAFC.org for more. Take Care. Be Careful. Pass It On. BillyG The Secret List 10-20-2014-2220 hrs www.FireFighterCloseCalls.com ...


HOSE FALLS OFF TOLEDO ENGINE COMPANY - STRIKING BICYCLIST AND CARS
One person was hurt when a Toledo Fire truck lost a hose while driving on an emergency run. The 150 foot attack hose somehow became loose and struck three cars and a bicyclist 4:30pm on Hawley near Indiana.Fire officials say Engine 9 was rushing to a house fire with its lights and sirens on when the hose became loose and trailed behind.The hose wrapped under three cars southbound cars and it also yanked off a bicycle tire off its frame, throwing the man to the ground.The bicyclist was a Toledo man in his 50's. He was taken to the hospital with scrapes and a broken leg."It may have hit a bump down the road here and lost one of its attack lines came off the back," said Battalion Chief Bryce Blair. "Unfortunately the hose appears to have hit a bicyclist, that wrapped the bike and brought the bicyclist to the ground."Drivers tell us they could not believe what had happened."The hose was hanging probably 20-25 feet behind it, wagging back and forth," said Tim Stevenson, whose work van was struck. "First thing that came to my mind was 'oh my God' this is gonna hit me."Crews inside the rig didn't realize what had happened until someone called 911. Fire officials say this is rare and happens once in a blue moon. There's no word yet on how fast the rig was traveling.The accident is under investigation by Toledo Police. http://www.13abc.com/story/26822427/fire-truck-hose-strikes-bicyclist-and-cars...


FIRE CHIEF-LODD-EJECTION RESPONSE CRASH (The Secret List)
MISSOURI FIRE CHIEF/POLICE OFFICER LODD-RESPONDING CRASH-EJECTED The Secret List www.FireFighterCloseCalls.com We regret to advise you that Alton Fire Chief Eddie Johnson Jr., 45, was responding to a house fire six miles west of Alton when he lost control, went off the left side of the highway, hit a driveway approach, and rolled his vehicle several times.  He was ejected from the vehicle and killed in the Line of Duty. He was also an Alton Police Officer.  The crash was on U.S. 160 about five miles west of Alton.  An ambulance took the Chief to the hospital in West Plains but he did not survive.  State troopers suspect Chief Johnson was not wearing his safety belt. The Alton Fire Department was responding with other area fire departments to a house fire at an area known locally as Royal Oak.   The fire destroyed the home. Besides being a full-time police officer and volunteer fire chief, Johnson also was an Oregon County reserve sheriff's deputy.  He'd been fire chief since 2010 and worked in the Alton Police Department for nine years.   His wife and three children survive him. We'll post more details as they become available. Our condolences to all affected. RIP. Take Care. Be Careful. Pass It On. BillyG The Secret List 10-20-2014-2233 hrs www.FireFighterCloseCalls.com...


CRASH KILLS FIRE CHIEF/POLICE OFFICER IN ALTON, MO RESPONDING TO FIRE
An Alton police officer who is also a firefighter died after a crash on Monday.  Eddie Johnson Jr., 45, was on his way to a house fire six miles west of Alton when he lost control, went off the left side of the highway, hit a driveway approach, and rolled his police cruiser several times.  He was ejected from the vehicle. The crash was on U.S. 160 about five miles west of Alton.  An ambulance took the officer to the hospital in West Plains but he did not survive.  State troopers think Johnson was not wearing his safety belt.The Alton Fire Department was responding with other area fire departments to a house fire at an area known locally as Royal Oak.   The fire destroyed the home.Besides being a full-time police officer and volunteer fire chief, Johnson also was an Oregon County reserve sheriff's deputy.  He'd been fire chief since 2010 and worked in the Alton Police Department for nine years.   His wife and three children survive him.U.S. 160 was closed for several hours while a Missouri State Highway Patrol major crash investigation team did its measurements and investigation.http://www.kspr.com/news/local/crash-kills-police-officerfire-chief-on-way-to-fire/21051620_29240208...


IAFF/IAFF EBOLA TRAINING INFO
The IAFF has released the below video of interest to all fire fighters and EMS personnel related to Ebola education and response.  Take a moment to watch and learn from this excellent presentation----and note the recommended SAFETY STAND DOWN: http://youtu.be/4cL-BZw6u3E  WATCH the Stand Down statement video from the IAFF GP:  http://youtu.be/4AFtdMYI6tk  Check out www.IAFF.org for more.  Additionally, the IAFC has provided an excellent resource page:  http://www.iafc.org/ebola The IAFC has formed an Ebola Task Force to provide guidance for the health and safety of fire fighters, EMT's and responders and patients in response to the recent diagnoses of several Ebola patients in the United States. The task force will be chaired by IAFC 2nd Vice President Chief John Sinclair and will include members and leadership from the Safety, Health & Survival Section-of the IAFC. The IAFC’s Ebola Task Force will review the management of Ebola patients from the time an emergency call is placed until the patient is confirmed as either having or not having Ebola. The task force will review several important issues with short- and long-term implications, including: Screening 9-1-1 calls for potential Ebola patientsProper PPETraining for PPE donning/doffing proceduresDecontamination practicesDefinition of exposureQuarantining employees who provide care for potential Ebola patientsOther issues as they arise Fire and EMS personnel should understand that this is an evolving and dynamic process; current best practices will evolve as new information is received. The task force will be meeting with the experts and will continue to educate and inform the fire service. Watch IAFC.org for more....


WACK JOB STEALS AMBULANCE IN - ENGINE COMPANY PURSUES
A man undergoing treatment for hallucination inside a Los Angeles Fire Department ambulance in downtown Los Angeles stole the emergency vehicle Sunday night, forcing two firefighter paramedics to jump out and an engine company to pursue. The firefighters were treating a patient at about 7 p.m. at Alameda and 3rd streets, when he pulled out his IV and ran out of the ambulance. The man reappeared a short time later, jumped into the ambulance and began driving away. The two firefighter paramedics quickly jumped out.As per protocol, the ambulance was left running. The engine company followed the ambulance until LAPD officers arrived and took over the pursuit. About five minutes later, the ambulance crashed into a minivan at Union Place and Beverly Boulevard in the Rampart area of Los Angeles. The two people in the minivan suffered minor injuries. No firefighters were injured or involved in the crash, fire officials said."Initially it didn't make sense at all to anybody that the fire department was chasing one of its own vehicles," LAPD Lt. Theresa Coyle said. "As it became clear, gratefully no one was seriously injured."The male suspect was arrested and is expected to face felony evading and carjacking charges. ...


Making ambulances safer for patients and EMTs
“Ambulance Accident Leads to Three Fatalities.” Under this 2014 headline was a tragic, disturbingly familiar news story: A medic, patient and passenger all died when the ambulance driver lost control on an icy road and rolled the ambulance. While the EMT driver survived, those in the patient compartment did not. The accident occurred in Texas, but it could have happened anywhere. James Green, a persuasive engineer with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), wants to make it safer for anyone in the back of an ambulance and is working to reduce the hazards. Alarmed by statistics revealing the vulnerability of EMTs and patients in crashes, Green spent years building partnerships with ambulance manufacturers to crash-test their products and devise improvements. His work with the public–private team has led him to propose 10 crash safety standards or recommended practices for ambulances and their equipment. The proposals have already triggered some safety reforms within the ambulance manufacturing industry and are under consideration by National Association of State EMS Officials. “Manufacturers are already stepping up to the plate and taking advantage of the science,” said Dawn Castillo, director of the Division of Safety Research at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “The progress that has been made is remarkable.” Historically, ambulances have been designed, built and sold without crash certification testing, and most fall under state rather than federal regulatory authority. Although they often travel at high speeds, a lot of their equipment isn’t bolted down, and patients and emergency crew are on cots and seating that don’t meet automotive crash-testing requirements. Green’s interest in the safety project was spurred in part by Bureau of Labor Statistics data that showed EMS personnel involved in crashes had a fatality rate more than twice the national average for all workers. NIOSH also knew from its own earlier testing that ambulances’ structural integrity was compromised in crashes at 30 miles per hour. Yet, unlike with passenger cars, no national crash safety standards have existed for the ambulances, cots, patient compartment seating or medical equipment mounts. “I compare it to the airport. You’ve just gotten off the plane and into a rental shuttle. You are sitting on bench seats, the luggage is sitting on the shelf next to you with no safety compartment, and there are no seatbelts,” Green said. “In an industry with 800,000 workers, both worker and patient safety becomes a great concern. Improving safety can help any and every American at some point in their lives.” Green initially drew restraint system manufacturers to the table with a fairly modest goal—to learn from what the military had done to protect personnel transported in helicopters. “I had come from a Navy side where we had workers in the back of helicopters standing up. They used a restraint that allowed them to sit or stand,” he said. Eventually the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) joined his project and enlisted a group of first responders. When DHS staffers sat down with the EMTs, firefighters and police to discuss their experiences, the group asked for safety standards. Green decided to figure out how to make the back compartment of an ambulance stronger. NIOSH began crash-testing to learn what happened when equipment and crash dummies were subjected to rear, side, and front and rollover accident forces. Green, meanwhile, continued to add new players to his team, drawing in more than a dozen commercial interests with a stake in the ambulance industry. “Seeing their commitment to this project and trust they have in the government has really been a highlight of my career,” he said. “We were able to build these standards throughout the industry, where there weren’t any requirements to do it. It was all voluntary. We were able to do the groundwork needed to provide confidence to the industry that we weren’t there to hurt them, and we were able to do it collaboratively.” While the federal government funded the actual crash-testing, manufacturers supplied engineering and testable products. That more than doubled the amount of direct funding for the project. “Jim’s leadership throughout this process is what has made this,” says Steve Spata, technical services manager with the Association for the Work Truck Industry. Green’s long-term goal is to bring ambulances up to the same level of safety found in passenger cars. He and some of his partners are working with state EMS officials in pushing for adoption of his proposed standards. Already, though, they are driving positive changes and seeing new crashworthy products come on the market, although wholesale change will not occur until old-style ambulances are replaced with new ones, and until individual states begin to adopt the new standards. “Jim is dedicated to this project, but also dedicated to the community,” says Jim Grove, senior advisor to the DHS Science and Technology Directorate. “I’m proud of what Jim does. He realizes how important it is.” This article was jointly prepared by the Partnership for Public Service, a group seeking to enhance the performance of the federal government, and washingtonpost.com. Go to the Fed Page of The Washington Post to read about other federal workers who are making a difference....


Apparatus Recall, Calif LODD Funeral Details, Hartford Shirts (The Secret List)
Hey, A new recall has been issued by the maker of the fire apparatus chassis involved in that June crash that killed a Montana Fire Chief and a family of five. The recall of the double Cardan front drive shaft comes from Navistar which manufactures the International 4800 apparatus involved in the crash in June. The recall by Navistar is for International 4800 trucks built between 1999 and 2002 that are equipped with Fabco TC-200 transfer cases. The recall notice says the driveshaft may separate and cause axle lockup if a joint in the driveshaft seizes. The recall was issued after the Montana Highway Patrol released their accident report. The recall is slightly different from previous recalls in that this one requires the part to be removed and replaced. Navistar's communications director, Steve Schrier tells media that Navistar has not received their report, but issued the recall after conducting their own investigation. He says an investigation is often launched after consumer concerns about a possible defect. During their investigations they look at things such as warranty claims and gather data from field reports. If a defect is found, Navistar then issues a recall and notifies their customers to correct the defect. In this particular case, Schrier said their investigation found 5 other incidents since 2008 which prompted them to issue the voluntary recall. Navistar has notified all customers and are in the process of implementing the voluntary recall. CALIFORNIA FIREFIGHTER LODD FUNERAL: Firefighters will gather together to pay their respects to Airtanker Pilot Geoffrey “Craig” Hunt as well as to his family, who paid the ultimate sacrifice with his life while fighting the Dog Rock Fire near El Portal, California.  A celebration of Craig’s life, with full Line of Duty Death fire service honors, will take place Tuesday, October 21, 2014 at 10 a.m. On October 7, 2014, Dyncorp Pilot Geoffrey “Craig” Hunt was involved in a fatal crash while flying a CAL FIRE S-2T Airtanker over the Dog Rock Fire burning near Yosemite’s Arch Rock. Geoffrey “Craig” Hunt was born October 14, 1951 in Richmond, IN. He is survived by his wife, Sally, who he married in September of 1975, and his two daughters, Nancy Hunt and Sarah Hunt Lauterbach. Hunt served as a US Navy P3 pilot from 1975-1984 and was in the reserves for 20 years. Memorial Service Location: Church on the Hill, 500 Sands Dr., San Jose, CA 95125 Date: Tuesday, October 21, 2014 at 10 a.m. RIP. HARTFORD (CT) FD LODD FUNDRAISER SHIRTS...


Pedestrians manage to cheat death after being caught up in crash - China
Two pedestrians have managed to survive a crash between an ambulance and a car that sent them airborne and flying across the road in China.CCTV from the intersection shows the moment the ambulance runs through a red light before clipping the back of a car. The impact sends the car spinning out of control before it hurtles towards the two pedestrians who are attempting to cross the road. The impact flings the pair into the air before they come to a rest a metre or so away from the scene of the crash. Miraculously the pair only sustained minor fractures in the incident.&nb...


EVEN THE MEDICAL WORLD HAS TROUBLE WITH PROPER PPE
Don't you think with all the hype that the clown with the clipboard should be in PPE due to the EBOLA?...






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